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African Diaspora Public Lecture Series

Location: Faculty of Education Block Room S7
Contact: Institute of Post School Studies: 3748273@myuwc.ac.za

African Diaspora Public Lecture Series

Starts: 2017/07/05 12:00
Ends: 2017/07/05 14:00
 

African Diaspora Public Lecture Series​

Click here to view the live streaming of this event

DOCTORAL STUDIES IN HIGHER EDUCATION STUDIES

 

INVITATION TO A PUBLIC LECTURE

African Diaspora Public Lecture Series

 

Date: Wednesday, 5th July, 2017

Time: 12noon-2pm

Venue: Faculty of Education Block (Room S27)

                                   

Professor Clapperton Chakanetsa Mavhunga

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA


TITLE: What Do Science, Technology, and Innovation Mean from Africa?

Synopsis: “In the science, technology, and innovation (STI) literature, Africa has often been regarded as a recipient of science, technology, and innovation rather than a maker of them. In this lecture, Prof. Mavhunga shows that STI in Africa is not merely the product of “technology transfer” from elsewhere but the working of African knowledge. Based on the just-published edited volume under the same title, the lecture invites us to seriously grapple with African ways of looking, meaning-making, and creating, specifically to see Africans as intellectual agents whose perspectives constitute authoritative knowledge and whose strategic deployment of both endogenous and inbound things represents an African-centered notion of STI.”

 

 Clapperton Chakanetsa Mavhunga is an associate professor of science, technology, and society at MIT. His professional interests lie in the history, theory, and practice of science, technology, innovation, and entrepreneurship in the international context, with a focus on Africa. He is the author of Transient Workspaces: Technologies of Everyday Innovation in Zimbabwe (MIT Press, 2014), and editor of What Do Science, Technology, and Innovation Mean from Africa? (MIT Press, 2017) which explores STI in Africa from an archaeological, historical, philosophical, anthropological, STS, engineering, development, and policymaking perspective. Mavhunga’s second monograph—on tsetse fly as a site of African knowledge production—is in production and is expected late 2017 or early 2018. 

 

The public lecture will be useful for academics, researchers and postgraduate students.

RSVP: Dr.Patrick Swanzy, IPSS-Higher Education Studies, UWC

Email: 3748273@myuwc.ac.za

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