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An Invitation to Dr Burek's presentation focusing on international law and domestic violence

Location: Seminar Room 2, Faculty of Law Buiding

African and European international law responses to violence against women and domestic violence as a part of the ongoing implementation and evolution of the international women’s human rights framework

Starts: 2020/02/13 13:00
Ends: 2020/02/13 14:30

African and European international law responses to violence against women and domestic violence as a part of the ongoing implementation and evolution of the international women’s human rights framework

​​Violence against women (hereinafter: VAW) and domestic violence from the legal perspective is predominantly a criminal law issue, and as such, when it happens in ordinary situations (not during armed conflicts or as a form of e.g., crime against humanity, which are covered by the norms of international criminal law), it is an issue of domestic rather than international regulation. At least that was the reality of the past. A change started in 1992, when the CEDAW Committee (the UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women) adopted its General Recommendation no 19 on violence against women, stating that such violence is  a form of discrimination against women. This ‘soft-law’ document triggered enormous development of legally binding norms and other international practices which treat issues of VAW and domestic violence as a human rights issue. This development was strengthened by the notion of the positive obligation of the state to engage in activity to secure the effective enjoyment of rights. This idea gained particular importance within the system of the 1950 European Convention on Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, with the landmark case of Opuz v. Turkey of 2009.

After explaining the above mentioned development of tackling VAW and domestic violence from the perspective of international human rights law I will focus on African and European international law responses to this. My lecture aims not only to present the current state of affairs of these two regional perspectives within the wider frame of general international law but also to discuss possible future development and challenges in Africa and Europe, respectively.​

Click to download abstract: Dr Wojciech Burek's Abstract.pdf

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