16 July 2015
Seminar by Corinne Squire

Women’s and Gender Studies, Faculty of Arts and the School of Public Health, Faculty of Arts

Invite you to a Seminar by Corinne Squire

Narratives of living with HIV and ARVs: Reconfiguring the epidemic

DATE:Thursday 16 July 2015

TIME:12.30 for 1.00

VENUE:  School of Public Health

Narratives of living with HIV and ARVs: Reconfiguring the epidemic

Drawing on 2011 and 2012 interview studies about HIV support in the UK and South Africa, and relating them to some contemporary trends within the HIV epidemic, this presentation will explore how personal narratives of living with HIV and ARVs provide detailed explorations of HIV as a 'naturalised' phenomenon, but also register denaturalising inequities within the epidemic, and open up routes towards different, more equitable futures. Narratives can act as emergent forms of microtheory: highly particular, yet allowing understanding of overlooked issues. I will discuss how this microtheorisation happens within contemporary personal narratives about HIV, at a time of health, economic, social and affective precarity, when the HIV pandemic is both naturalised by its medicalization, normalisation and marketization, and denaturalised by difficulties of treatment, continuing, often gendered stigma, and resource constraint. The paper will argue that personal narratives of 'living on' with HIV in the UK, and 'living with' HIV in South Africa, can work to reconfigure both naturalised and denaturalised relations to the epidemic.

Corinne Squire is Professor of Social Sciences and Co-Director of the Centre for Narrative Research at the University of East London. Her research interests are in HIV and citizenship, popular culture and subjectivities, and narrative theory and methods. Recent publications include Living with HIV and ARVs: three-letter lives (Palgrave, 2013), Doing narrative research edition 2 (with Molly Andrews and Maria Tamboukou, Sage, 2013) and What is narrative research?  (with Mark Davis, Cigdem Esin, Molly Andrews, Barbara Harrison, Lars-Christer Hyden and Margareta Hyden, Bloomsbury, 2014).

RSVP:  Mawaddah Abrahams wgs@uwc.ac.za or Tammy Shefer tshefer@uwc.ac.za 0219592234