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CMDR Staff

Director

Bio
n Quentin Williams is Director of the Centre for Multilingualism and Diversities Research (CMDR) and an Associate Professor of Sociolinguistics in the Linguistics Department at the University of the Western Cape (UWC). He is also the Ghent Visiting Professor (Leerstoel Houer) at the Centre for Afrikaans and the study of South Africa at Ghent University (Belgium) (2020/2021). He has published journal articles, book chapters and Op-Ed pieces on the performance and practice of multilingualism, race, Hip Hop, language activism, Afrikaaps, and linguistic citizenship in South Africa. He is Co-Editor of the journal Multilingual Margins: a journal of Multilingualism from the periphery, and his most recent book is Neva Again: Hip Hop Art, Activism and Education in post-apartheid South Africa (HSRC Press, 2019, with Adam Haupt, H Samy Alim and Emile YX?). He is also author of Making Sense of People and Place in Linguistic Landscapes (Bloomsbury, 2018, with Amiena Peck and Christopher Stroud) and Remix Multilingualism (Bloomsbury Press, 2017). He also features on the Rap album #IntheKeyofB.
 

Junior Research Fellow

Bio
Jason Richardson is an Associate Researcher at the Centre for Multilingualism and Diversities Research His primary research interests include sociolinguistics, multilingualism, disability and youth studies. He has a particular interest in interactional sociolinguistic theory. He is current a Ph.D. candidate in the linguistics department at UWC his Ph.D. focuses how young disabled multilingual speakers use language and other semiotic resources in everyday setting to talk about their own disabilities.        
 

Research Fellow

Bio
Robyn Tyler is a senior researcher in the Centre. Her research focuses on language, literacy and identity in education with a special interest in language across the curriculum in multilingual contexts. She graduated with her doctorate in 2019 from the University of Cape Town. Her thesis reported on a linguistic ethnography conducted over nine months in a township high school. It explored meaning-making by bilingual English-isiXhosa Science learners in two learning sites: the traditional classroom setting and an after-school study group. Robyn is a researcher on the CMDR project Leveraging languages for Science learning in multilingual classrooms (2020-2022) which seeks to develop best practice in multilingual Science classrooms through teaching and supervising pre-service Science teachers in multilingual methods and tracking their uptake of these in their teaching. She has seven years of high school English teaching experience in South Africa and the United Kingdom. During this time she became interested in the role of language and identity in learning beyond the language classroom, particularly for non-dominant, multilingual students, and decided to pursue postgraduate studies in language and literacy education. Robyn has taught and supervised pre-service teachers in two South African universities and is currently co-supervising two doctoral students at Ghent University, Belgium. She is also a member of the bua-lit language and literacy collective which advocates for a rich literacies approach to the education of multilingual South African children. Robyn serves on the governing body of an ex-model C primary school in Cape Town where she has led the recent school language policy reform.     
 
Administrator
Faculty of Arts
Tel: +27 (21) 959 3746
Fax: +27 (21) 959 3000
Email: agrovers@uwc.ac.za 

Bio
Avril attended Secretarial College, Cape Town School of Commerce in Athlone after matric. She did Typing I, II and III, Shorthand and Secretarial Practice for two years.

She has worked at many reputable institutions, including RPM Construction (10 years), Realco Caravans (5 years), the Afrikaans Department at UWC (1 year), the Linguistics Department at UWC (24 years), Iilwimi at UWC (1 year). She has been at the CMDR since June 2013).

Avril has a passion for her work, the staff and students. She loves challenges, arranging functions like seminars, conferences and workshops and loves meeting new people. 
 

Research Fellows

Bio
Zannie Bock is an Associate Professor in the Linguistics Department at the University of the Western Cape (UWC). Her current research interests include work on discourse and narrative analysis, with a focus on race and language among university students, emerging styles in youth instant messaging chats, and decolonial approaches to literacy in higher education.

Recent publications focus on three main areas: first, how young South Africans in a range of multilingual institutional settings use language to negotiate their racial identities and positions, and the role of ‘small stories’ in these complex positionings. A second focus has been the emerging styles of mobile chatting among UWC students. Her overriding concern is with the multifaceted and innovative ways in which young people use language to express their identities and negotiate their positions in a complex and rapidly transforming post-apartheid South Africa. A third significant dimension to her work is a new research project in decolonial literacies and pedagogies in higher education, and the preparation of a volume of essays, co-edited by herself and Christopher Stroud, entitled, Languages and Literacies in higher education: Reclaiming voices from the south (Bloomsbury Press).

She is also the project leader and co-editor of the Linguistics department’s textbook, Language, society and communication: an introduction, published in 2014 (second edition in 2019).

Bio
Prof. Antjie Krog is an Afrikaans poet, writer and translator. She published twelve volumes of poetry in Afrikaans of which three volumes were compiled with English translations: Down to my Last Skin (2000), Body Bereft (2006) and Synapse (2014). She also published three non-fiction books: Country of my Skull (1998), on the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission; A Change of Tongue (2004) about the transformation in South Africa after ten years and Begging to be Black (2009) about learning to live within a black majority. An academic book There was this Goat (2009) was co-authored with Prof. Kopano Ratele and Nosisi Mpolweni, investigating the Truth Commission testimony of Mrs Notrose Nobomvu Konile. A book of essays titled Conditional Tense – Memory and Vocabulary after the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission was published in 2013 as part of Seagull Books’ African List.

Krog received honorary doctorates from the Universities of Stellenbosch, Free State and the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan. Internationally she was awarded the Stockholm prize from the Hiroshima Foundation for Peace and Culture for the year 2000, the Open Society Prize from the Central European University and the Dutch Gouden Ganzenveer 2018 as well as an Honorary Doctorate from the Tavistock Clinic of the University of East London UK.

Krog taught at Columbia University’s Institute for Comparative Literature and Society established by Gyatri Spivak an eight-session mini-seminar: Translating Indigenous Language in South Africa: Politics and Poetics; she also lectured at UNSAM university in Buenos Aires at the John Coetzee Cathedra (2016), also more recently at University of Oxford (2020); University of Groningen (2018); University of Ghent (2017); University of Pennsylvania (2017); Penn State University (2017); Bucknell University (2017); Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (2016); University of Lesotho (2015).

Publications

2020: “Comets, Porcupine-holes, Chiefs and Waggons – a complete interconnected universe in Mhudi”  in Sol Plaatje’s Mhudi: History, Criticism, Celebration.  Editors: Sabata-mpho Mokae and Brian Willan
2019: “I, who never was whole …” Monograph on Olga Kirsch in Naledi’s: Olga Kirsch: her English poetry.
2018: “To Write Liberty” Current Writing: Text and Reception in Southern Africa.Vol 30.
2016:  “…oi,oi!...you must go by the right path': Mofolo's Chaka revisited via the original text.” Tydskrif vir Letterkunde      2309-9070         
2015:   “Mqhayi’s chapter and verse: Kees van die Kalahari becoming u-Adonisi wasentlango.” Antjie Krog and Sindiwe Magona  Tydskrif vir Letterkunde • 52 (1) • 2015 5    
2015:‘They Couldn’t Achieve their Goal with Me’ Telling Rape During the South African War - Tijdschrift voor Nederlandse Taal- en Letterkunde Uitgegeven vanwege de Maatschappij der Nederlandse Letterkunde te Leiden Deel 131 (2015), afl. 4
https://www.facebook.com/SABCNewsWesternCape/photos/africa-pulse-a-three-year-translation-project-that-has-seen-several-books-by-cla/2757849854267381/
https://www.torch.ox.ac.uk/article/africa-pulse-videos-released
https://artefactsofwriting.com/2020/09/01/art-action-an-exchange-with-antjie-krog/

Bio
Sindiwe Magona was born on 27 August 1943, in the village of Gungululu in rural Eastern Cape (formerly Transkei). The first born of eight children, Magona earned her secondary and undergraduate education by correspondence, and later won a scholarship to study for her Master’s Degree in Social Work at Columbia University in the United States of America. Magona is one of many internationally prominent South African writers whose work is informed by her experience of impoverishment, femininity, resistance to subjugation and being a domestic worker. She traversed South Africa’s racially-defined socio-cultural-economic spaces while simultaneously being a mother, wife and community leader in a township. These interlaced themes and realities are pronounced throughout her literary career.

A former primary school teacher and civil servant, she is a prolific author who has produced nine books, among them an autobiographical work, a collection of short stories, novellas and an anthology of poetry.

She has produced various plays and continues to lecture and deliver key addresses at universities and conferences, both locally and internationally. Until her retirement in 2003, she contributed immeasurably in various capacities to the work of the United Nations (UN), an organisation she served for 20 years.

Even in retirement, she continues to pen literary works, to initiate writers’ conferences, lead women’s rights advocacy groups and write children’s educational books. Among her internationally acclaimed works are Beauty’s Gift; Living, Loving, and Lying Awake at Night; To My Children’s Children; Teach Yourself Xhosa; and Push-Push and Other Stories. Her plays include I Promised Myself a Fabulous Middle-Age and Vukani.

Magona is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Molteno Gold Medal for Lifetime Achievement for her role in promoting isiXhosa, the Permio Grinzane Terre D’Otrantro, and the Department of Arts and Culture Literary Lifetime Achievement Award (all three received in 2007); the Bronx Recognises Its Own Fiction Award in 2000; a Fellowship for Non-Fiction from the New York Foundation of the Arts; the Xhosa Heroes Award; and the UNdimande Grand Prize. The Hartwick College of New York conferred her with an honorary doctorate in 1993. She was shortlisted for the Commonwealth Writer’s Prize in 2009.

She remains an accomplished motivational speaker, author, poet, playwright and story-teller in South Africa. Many of Ms Magona’s essays, short stories and poems have been anthologised. She has been published in, among other publications, the New York Times, The New Internationalist, Fair Lady, Oprah Magazine and Femina.

She is also recognised for her work in women’s issues, the plight of children and the fight against apartheid and racism. Ms Magona is the founder and Executive Director of South Africa 2033. A worker for peaceful change during the years of struggle in South Africa, she was one of the founding members of the Women’s Peace Movement in 1976.

With her inspiration and encouragement, the Gugulethu Writers’ Group meets once a month and nurtures new writers. The group has already published a collection of short stories, Umthi ngamnye unentlaka yawo, and won First Prize in the Maskew Miller Longman Story Competition in 2009.

In recognition of her literary and humanitarian contribution, the State President, Jacob G Zuma, conferred Sindiwe Magona with the Order of Ikhamanga in Bronze on 27 April 2011.

Bio
Jason Richardson is an Associate Researcher at the Centre for Multilingualism and Diversities Research His primary research interests include sociolinguistics, multilingualism, disability and youth studies. He has a particular interest in interactional sociolinguistic theory. He is current a Ph.D. candidate in the linguistics department at UWC his Ph.D. focuses how young disabled multilingual speakers use language and other semiotic resources in everyday setting to talk about their own disabilities.        

Publications
Stroud, C., & Richardson, J. (2019). Multilinguismo na África do Sul. Ciência e Cultura, 71(4), 25-29
Williams, Q., Adams, T. & Richardson, J., “Towards a Sociolinguistics of Non-Racialism” Forthcoming
Richardson, J., & Williams, Q., Youth Multilingual Interactions and Discourses of Disability at a Special Needs High School in Cape Town, South Africa”

Forthcoming
Richardson., “Weaves of vulnerability: narratives of escape” In C Stroud and Q. Williams (Eds). Pluriversal vulnerability: The making and unmaking of language and selves. Bloomsbury Press. Forthcoming

Bio
Robyn Tyler is a senior researcher in the Centre. Her research focuses on language, literacy and identity in education with a special interest in language across the curriculum in multilingual contexts. She graduated with her doctorate in 2019 from the University of Cape Town. Her thesis reported on a linguistic ethnography conducted over nine months in a township high school. It explored meaning-making by bilingual English-isiXhosa Science learners in two learning sites: the traditional classroom setting and an after-school study group. Robyn is a researcher on the CMDR project Leveraging languages for Science learning in multilingual classrooms (2020-2022) which seeks to develop best practice in multilingual Science classrooms through teaching and supervising pre-service Science teachers in multilingual methods and tracking their uptake of these in their teaching. She has seven years of high school English teaching experience in South Africa and the United Kingdom. During this time she became interested in the role of language and identity in learning beyond the language classroom, particularly for non-dominant, multilingual students, and decided to pursue postgraduate studies in language and literacy education. Robyn has taught and supervised pre-service teachers in two South African universities and is currently co-supervising two doctoral students at Ghent University, Belgium. She is also a member of the bua-lit language and literacy collective which advocates for a rich literacies approach to the education of multilingual South African children. Robyn serves on the governing body of an ex-model C primary school in Cape Town where she has led the recent school language policy reform.

External links:
https://bua-lit.org.za/
https://uwc.academia.edu/RobynTyler

Publications
Tyler, R (2016). Discourse-shifting practices of a teacher and learning facilitator in a bilingual Mathematics classroom, Per Linguam 32 (3): 13-27, http://dx.doi.org/10.5785/32-3-685

Guzula, X; McKinney, C and Tyler, R (2016). Languaging-for-learning: Legitimising translanguaging and enabling multimodal practices in thirdspaces. Southern African Linguistics and Applied Language Studies, 34 (3): 211-226, DOI: 10.2989/16073614.2016.1250360

McKinney, C. & Tyler, R. (2019). Disinventing and reconstituting language for learning in school Science. Language and Education, 33 (2), 141-158.

Tyler, R. (2019). Semiotic repertoires in bilingual Science learning: a study of learners’ meaning-making practices in two sites in a Cape Town high school (Doctoral dissertation, Faculty of Humanities, University of Cape Town).
Tyler, R. & McKinney, M. (forthcoming). Language ideologies and learning Science: expanding semiotic repertoires. In V. Pfeiffer and C. van der Walt (Eds.) Multilingual classroom contexts: perspectives from the chalk face. Stellenbosch: African Sun Media.

Tyler, R. (forthcoming). Language and identity meshing in learning Science bilingually: tales of a “coconuty nerd”. In Christie, P & McKinney, C (eds). Teacher education in contexts of de/coloniality: conversations in the borders. Bristol: Multilingual Matters.

Bio
Duncan Brown is Professor of English in the Centre for Multilingualism and Diversities Research at the University of the Western Cape. He has published widely in the field of South African literary and cultural studies, and his books include Voicing the Text: South African Oral Poetry and Performance (1998), Oral Literature and Performance in Southern Africa (1999), To Speak of this Land: Identity and Belonging in South Africa and Beyond (2006), Religion and Spirituality in South Africa: New Perspectives (2009), Are Trout South African? Stories of Fish, People and Places (2013), Wilder Lives: Humans and Our Environments (2019), and Finding My Way: Reflections on South African Literature (2020).

He is Principal Investigator on a multilingual interdisciplinary project on “Rethinking South African Literature(s)”, funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and involving a large group of researchers from UWC, as well as from other universities in South Africa, Canada, Jamaica and the UK (2019-2022).

He is also Principal Investigator (with Prof. Knut Nustad, University of Oslo) on the South African section of the project “Global Trout: Investigating Environmental Change through More-than-Human World Systems” (2019-2022). This is an interdisciplinary project bringing together humanities scholars and scientists from Norway, Denmark, Japan, Argentina, South Africa and the UK.

Brown is also a Fellow of the University of KwaZulu-Natal, and a Fellow of the Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Study.

Publications
2019. Wilder Lives: Humans and Our Environments. Pietermaritzburg: University of KwaZulu-Natal Press. (216 pages)

2019. “‘That Man Patton’: The Personal History of a Book”. Current Writing 31(2): 107-115.

2020. Finding My Way: Reflections on South African Literature. Pietermaritzburg: University of KwaZulu-Natal Press.

2020. (Ed. with Antjie Krog). Special Issue of Multilingual Margins 7 (2) on “Writing Abuse”.

2021. “Afterthoughts: Multilingual Citizenship, Humans, Environments and Histories”. In: Zannie Bock and Chris Stroud (eds). Language and Decoloniality in Higher Education: Reclaiming Voices from the South. London: Bloomsbury: 201-215.

Bio
Christopher is a Professor of Linguistics at UWC and an affiliated Professor of Bilingual Research at the Centre for Research on Bilingualism at Stockholm University, Sweden. Before coming to UWC, he spent six years in Singapore at the National University of Singapore, Department of English Language and Literature. He has researched in Southern Africa (Mozambique and South Africa) in the fields of linguistic human rights and linguistic citizenship, colonialism and post-coloniality in constructions of multilingualism, language ideological debates, the development of Portuguese L2 varieties and mother tongue and bilingual education.
 
He also did research in Singapore in the areas of politics of language and literacy education and the sociolinguistics of globalisation and mobilisation; in Sweden in the fields of language loss, maintenance and revival, the metaphorical use of language in public debates (particularly, the notions of Semi-lingualism and Rinkeby Swedish), second language acquisition and bilingual language pathologies; and in Papua New Guinea with linguistic descriptions of small languages, the sociolinguistics of contact and code-switching, and emerging vernacular literacies. 

He has worked as a consultant for international organisations such as the Finnish International Development Agency (FINNIDA), the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA) and the South African Renewable Energy Council (SAREC) with research and capacity development at the National Institute of Education in Mozambique, and in the development and evaluation of language curricula and its implementation.

His current research interests focus on practices and ideologies of multilingualism in social and politically transforming economies in Southern Africa. For the past five years, he has been working on semiotic landscapes and consumption in the townships and informal settlements of Cape Town and exploring the potential of multilingual mobile literacies and modes of local engagement in emerging community literacies, for voice and agency in the townships of Manenberg and Khayelitsha. He is working towards a notion of linguistic/multilingual citizenship as an approach to multilingual dynamics and the politics of language.

Publications
Stroud, C. & Wee, L. (2008). Political economies of literacy in multilingual South-East Asia. Special Issue of International Journal of Bilingualism and Bilingual Education (eds. Stroud, C. & Wee, L.), 11/2: 129-133. 

Stroud, C. & Wee, L. (2007), Language policy and linguistic practices in Singapore. Sociolinguistic Studies, 1/2: 197-216. 

Stroud, C. & Wee, L. (2007), Consuming identities. Language planning and policy in Singaporean late modernity. Language Policy, 6: 253-279. 

Stroud, C. & Wee, L. (2007), Identity, second language literacy and remedial crossing: Exploring liminalities in social positioning in the classroom. TESOL Quarterly, 41/1: 33- 54. 

Stroud, C. & Wee, L. (2006), Anxiety and identity in the language classroom. RELC, 37/3: 299-313.

Scientific Committee

Bio
Ana is an Associate Professor at UWC. Her research programme is located within the broad field of African Sociolinguistics and has a strong interdisciplinary focus with particular attention to anthropology, sociology, and economics. She has worked on the History of Afrikaans (The Dynamics of Cape Dutch, 2004) and co-authored Introducing Sociolinguistics (2009, with Rajend Mesthrie, Joan Swann and William Leap) and the Dictionary of Sociolinguistics (2004, with Joan Swann, Rajend Mesthrie and Theresa Lillis). 

Her latest book looks at mobile communication from a global perspective (Sociolinguistics and Mobile Communication, 2014). She is the editor of IMPACT – Studies in Language and Society (Amsterdam/New York: John Benjamins) and co-editor of Cambridge Approaches to Language Contact (with Salikoko Mufwene). She is also an NRF-rated scientist and a member of several editorial boards.

Publications
Forthcoming. Globalisation Off the Beaten Track – Chinese Migration to South Africa’s Rural Towns. In: Multilingualism in the Chinese Diaspora Worldwide, ed. by Li Wei. London: Routledge.

Forthcoming. Linguistics and Social Media. In: Handbook of Linguistics, ed. by Keith Allen. London: Routledge.

Forthcoming. KLK CC – Conformity and Transgression on an On-line Educational Site. In: Language, Literacy and Diversity, ed. by Mastin Prinsloo and Chris Stroud. London: Routledge.

2014. Digital Superdiversity: Theoretical Reflections. Discourse, Context & Media.

2014. Sites of Struggle and Possibility in Cyberspace – Wikipedia and Facebook in Africa. In: The Media and Sociolinguistic Change, ed. by Jannis Androutsopoulos. Berlin: De Gruyter.

2014. The Performance of a Ludic Self of Social Network(ing) Sites. In: The Language of Social Media: Communication and Community on the Internet, ed. by Philip Seargeant and Caroline Tagg. London/New York: Palgrave/MacMillan.

2014. South Africa’s Language Ecology – Hierarchies, Hegemonies and Resistances. In: Language Ecology of the 21st Century: Social Conflicts in their Linguistic Environment, ed. by E.-H. Jahr, P. Trudgill, and W. Vandenbussche. Oslo: Novis.

2013. Language, Culture and Society. In: The Oxford Handbook of the History of Linguistics, ed. by K. Allan. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

2013. Texting Africa: Writing as Performance. With Kirstin Vold Lexander. Journal of Sociolinguistics.

2013. Xhosa in Town (Revisited) –Space, Place and Language. International Journal of the Sociology of Language.

2013. ‘Every day a new shop pops up’ – South Africa’s ‘New’ Chinese Diaspora and the Multilingual Transformation of Rural Towns. With Nkululeko Mabandla. English Today. 29: 44-52.

Bio
Birgitta is a Professor for Applied Linguistics at the University of Vienna. She has also been working for many years as an expert for the Council of Europe, where she was first involved in the Confidence-Building Measures Programme in Eastern and South-Eastern Europe and focuses now on questions of linguistic rights and interethnic relations. Since 2001 she cooperates closely in research projects and teaching with colleagues in South Africa. Her main research interests focus on sociolinguistics, discourse analysis, and biographic approaches in linguistics.
 

Bio
Elizabeth is a Professor of Linguistics at the Department of Linguistics and Scandinavian Studies, and Director of the Center on Multilingualism in Society across the Lifespan, University of Oslo, Norway. Her research addresses various issues in bilingualism and multilingualism. She has published on language socialisation of bilingual children, identity in migrant narratives, language ideology, linguistic landscape, language policy, and research methodology. 

Her work has appeared in various journals and edited volumes. She is on the editorial board of the International Journal of Bilingualism, Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, Linguistic Landscape, and Multilingual Margins, as well as the book series IMPACT: Studies in Language and Society. Elizabeth is on the Advisory Board of the Centre for Literacy and Multilingualism (CeLM) at the University of Reading, UK, and a member of the External Advisory Board of the Center for Multilingual and Intercultural Communication at Stony Brook University, USA. She is also a member of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters.
 

Bio
Jan is a Professor of Language, Culture and Globalisation and Director of the Babylon Center at Tilburg University, the Netherlands, and Professor of African Linguistics and Sociolinguistics at Ghent University, Belgium. He holds honorary appointments at UWC and Beijing Language and Culture University (China) and is the group leader of the Max Planck Sociolinguistic Diversity Working Group. 

He has published widely on language ideologies and language inequality in the context of globalisation.
 
Publications 
Ethnography, Superdiversity and Linguistic Landscapes: Chronicles of Complexity (Multilingual Matters, 2013). 

The Sociolinguistics of Globalization (Cambridge University Press, 2010). 

Ethnographic Fieldwork: A Beginner’s Guide (Multilingual Matters, 2010).

Grassroots Literacy (Routledge, 2008). 

Discourse: A Critical Introduction (Cambridge University Press, 2005).
 

Bio
Lionel is a Professor in the Department of English Language and Literature, and Vice-Dean of the Research Division at the National University of Singapore. His research focuses on applied linguistics and sociolinguistics, as well as matters of “pure” sociology. His articles have appeared in many journals including, Applied Linguistics, English World-Wide, Journal of Multilingual & Multicultural Development, Journal of Sociolinguistics, Language Policy, Language & Society, Pragmatics & Society, and World Englishes. 

Publications 
Language Without Rights (Oxford University Press, New York, 2011). 

Style, Identity and Literacy (with Christopher Stroud, Multilingual Matters, Clevedon, 2011).
 
Markets of English (with Joseph Park, Routledge, London, 2012). 

Consumption, Rights and States: Comparing Global Cities in Asia and the US (with Ann Brooks, Anthem Press, 2014). 

The Language of Organizational Styling (Cambridge University Press, 2015). 

Forthcoming. A book (with Ann Brooks) about emotions and cities.